Details about Concreting under Special Conditions

Concreting under Special Conditions There are three type of concreting under special conditions, Namely Work in Extreme Weather Conditions Under Water Concreting Concrete in Sea Water Work in Extreme Weather Conditions: During hot and cold weather, the concreting shall be done as per the procedure set out in IS 7861 (Part–I)-1975 and IS 7861 (Part II)-1981 respectively. Concreting shall not be done when the temperature falls below 4.5ºC. In cold weather, the concrete placed shall be protected against frost. During

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Cement Mortar for masonry – materials, mixing and technical details

Cement Mortars Desirable properties of mortars for use in masonry are: (a)        Workability (b)        Water retentivity (c)        Rate of stiffing (d)        Strength (e)        Resistance to rain penetration (f)        Durability MATERIALS Water Water used for mixing and curing shall be clean and free from injurious quantities of alkalies, acids, oils, salts, sugar, organic materials, vegetable growth or other substance that may be deleterious to bricks, stone, concrete or steel. potable water is generally considered satisfactory for mixing. The Ph value of

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Earthwork excavation by using Machines

Earth Work Excavation by Mechanical means Earth work by mechanical means involves careful planning keeping in view site conditions i.e. type of soil, nature of excavation, distances through which excavated soil is to be transported and working space available for employing these machines. The earth moving equipment should be accordingly selected. The earth moving equipment consists of excavating and transporting equipment. Excavating equipment’s may be further classified as excavators and tractor based equipment’s. Excavators Excavators generally used at site are

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Anti-Termite Treatment in building construction works and its technical details

ANTI-TERMITE TREATMENT IN CIVIL ENGINEERING Sub-terranean termites are responsible for most of the termite damage in buildings. Typically, they form nests or colonies underground. In the soil near ground level in a stump or other suitable piece of timber in a conical or dome shaped mound. The termites find access to the super-structure of the building either through the timber buried in the ground or by means of mud shelter tubes constructed over unprotected foundations. Termite control in existing as

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Earthwork excavation important terms and field level technical details

Earthwork excavation important terms and technical details Deadmen or Tell Tales: Mounds of earth left undisturbed in pits dug out for borrowing earth Burjis: Short pillars of brick/ stone having top surface finished with cement plaster for marking etc. Formation or Profile: Final shape of the ground after excavation or filling up. Foul condition: Filthy and unhygienic conditions where physical movements are hampered such as soil mixed with sewage or night soil. Lead : All distances shall be measured over

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Civil Engineering Interview Questions Part – 24

Question No. 01 Did any of the Egyptian pyramids ever fall down? Answer: Yes, many did. The great pyramid and others that have survived did so for a reason. Their shapes made them sturdier over time and were not the first design. Many steppe pyramids were built but were too steep and as the corners eroded, the whole pyramid fell under its own weight. They were built too steep and did not have the base structure as seen in the

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Civil Engineering Interview Questions Part – 23

Question No. 01 Which one is a better choice, a large diameter piles or a system of several smaller piles with the same load capacity? Answer: The choice of a large diameter pile suffers from the disadvantage that serious consequences would occur in case there is setting out error of the pile. Moreover, in terms of cost consideration, for the same load capacity the cost of a group of small diameter piles is generally lower than that of a large

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Civil Engineering Interview Questions Part – 22

Question No. 01 Why nautical mile is different from statute mile? Answer: One nautical mile is defined by one latitude minute of arc (there are 60 such minutes to adegree). This equals 1852 meters, and roughly (but coincidentally) 2000 yards or 6000 feet. (Edit: actually, a standard nautical mile is 6076 feet, 6000 feet and 2000 yards are commonly used approximations, but produce an error of about 1%). The statute mile had a little fuzzier definition to start with, as

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Civil Engineering Interview Questions Part – 21

Question No. 01 Should design life be the same as return period for design conditions? Answer: Design life means the minimum duration a structure is expected to last. The longer is the design life; the higher is the cost of a project. Therefore, in choosing the design life for a structure, engineers should consider the design life which generates a economical project without sacrificing the required function. In selection of return period of certain design conditions, winds, waves, etc., one

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Civil Engineering Interview Questions Part – 20

Question No. 01 How do engineer determine the number of cells for concrete box girder bridges? Answer: If the depth of a box girder bridge exceeds 1/6 or 1/5 of the bridge width, then it is recommended to be designed as a single cell box girder bridge. However, if the bridge depth is smaller than 1/6 of the bridge width, then a twin-cell or multiple cell is a better choice as suggested by Jorg Schlaich & Hartmut Scheef (1982). However,

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